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How To: Make a basic TAS in Super Mario 64

A TAS, in case you're outside too much to have heard of them before, is a tool-assisted speedrun. Basically you take a video game ROM and use some software like Mupen 64] to control the game's many parameters on a previously unattainable level. This allows for perfect manipulation of glitches and timing, and thus for much faster completions of the game than are possible unaided. This ...

How To: Start Developing Websites

How To Start To start developing website is a hard way to tell people depending on what they are best at. I'd like to describe a few of 'em. I will call them a few names depending on what effect comes out of 'em. And I will describe what developing languages there are out there and are most widely used. Let's start with that for now.

How To: Develop applications for the Apple iPhone

This is a lengthy, detailed series on iPhone development, for which you'll need an Intel-based Mac computer, running Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) or higher. Then, before you actually get started developing for the iPhone, you'll need to register as a developer with Apple. Then, you'll need to download Xcode and the iPhone SDK. Once you have all this, you can start developing iPhone applications!

How To: Use the OpenCL API for C programming

In this five-part video tutorial series, we learn how to get started using the OpenCL API for programming in C. It's an easy process and this video presents a complete guide. For more information, including a full demonstration and detailed, step-by-step instructions, watch this helpful home-computing how-to.

How To: Build a simple house in SketchUp

This video tutorial is in the Computers & Programming category which will show you how to build a simple house in SketchUp. Start with the floor plan, draw a rectangular main living space and attach a small extra room. Next you use the push pull tool and pull the house up to as high as you want. You can make it 21 feet. Now draw the roof line in the center of the house along the length and draw the lines for sloping part of the roof on either side. Now grab the center of the roof and lift it ...

How To: Use LISP programming language for beginners

The programming language LISP is definitely not as well known as XML or C++, but it's been around for a very long time and is one of the easiest computer programming languages to learn if you want to create a web server. It is a contemporary of Cobal and was devloped by John McCarthy. To learn how to use LISP for beginners, check out this tutorial.

How To: Activate Linux windows without losing selected text

In this video, we learn how to activate Linux windows without losing selected text. To avoid losing the texts, you can just click on the title bar so that the highlighted part doesn't remove. If you don't want to do this, there is an alternative. Simply mouse over the text that you have highlighted and scroll with the wheel that's on your mouse. After this, right click on the text and then you can copy what you need to. Now, you can go back to the other window you have open and paste it in, t...

How To: Create a zip file

In this Computers & Programming video tutorial you will learn how to create a zip file. You need to create a zip file in order to upload your website in to the digital dropbox in blackboard. Blackboard doesn't like folders with extra files in it. So you have to turn it into a zip file. You have created your 'my first website' inside which will have index files and image file. To get this onto blackboard in Mac, right click on the folder and select 'compress my first web site' option. Now you ...

How To: Get started with object oriented programming or OOP

Object-oriented programming (OOP)is a school of programming that considers a computer program a group of interacting objects rather than a sequence of tasks. This makes more sense to many people than the more more old-fashioned vector model, and if you want to get started in programming, then this video is for you. It will teach you all of the basics of OOP and tell you why you should use it.

How To: Use ratios when programming in Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to use Clojure ratios, and see why the IEEE 754 double is a better tool for most jobs. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Speed up a function when programming in Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to measure and improve the performance of a function. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Solve the "FizzBuzz" problem with Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to solve the classic FizBuzz problem with Clojure. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Use inversion of control (IOC) in Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to relate Java's inversion of control pattern to first class functions.. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Write an inference engine using Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to write an inference engine with Clojure 1.1. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Solve problems with infinite sequences in Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to use infinite sequences in Clojure to solve mathematical problems. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Create and use macros when programming in Clojure 1.1

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to create and work with macros in Clojure 1.1. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Install Counterclockwise, the Eclipse Clojure plugin

In this clip from Sean Devlin's "Full Disclojure" series of Clojure video tutorials, you'll see how to install Counterclockwise, a Clojure plugin for Eclipse. One of the most obvious perks of using the Clojure is the user community organized around it, which make learning the language a pleasure (and a simple one at that). For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

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